Category: Blog

Citizen Cyberscience Summit 2014

Citizen Cyberscience Summit 2014

Over this weekend, London has been the host to the Citizen Cyberscience Summit. I was asked to attend, and to collect some answers to the following questions to the delegates: 1) What is your vision for the future of citizen science? 2) What do you think the growing citizen science community needs? What I gathered …

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Beautiful data

Beautiful data

Infographics and data visualisations are becoming increasingly popular, and you see them almost everywhere you look. But what is their visual legacy? How has data visualisation evolved over time and what role does it play in science today? The British Library is opening their first science exhibition on February 20th: Beautiful Data, exploring exactly that. …

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PDF or HTML?

PDF or HTML?

Yesterday I was curious to see how scientists prefer to read academic papers: as a PDF or HTML?. I’m planning a Naturejobs podcast on publishing, and this question came to me. Here are some of the Twitter responses. If you’ve got any comments, please leave them below! I’d love to hear more about your opinions …

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Global vs Local

Global vs Local

Although I’m new to the world of print publishing, I have been writing online for a while. The more I time I spend writing online, the more I learn about how it works. But it’s not a quick process; it’s an ever changing scary world, so it’s hard to keep up. Being thrown into the …

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Citizen Cyberscience Summit

Citizen Cyberscience Summit

In two weeks time, the 3rd Citizen Cyberscience Summit will be held in London. In the past few months, I’ve been working closely with some of the Citizen Cyberlab team, making some videos of events they attend and running their podcast Citizens of Science, and have watched them get ready for the 2014 Citizen Cyberscience Summit. It’s traditionally …

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DIY Swimsuits

DIY Swimsuits

Back in the day (just over 110 years ago) swimming was just about making it to the Olympics. Swimming back then was nothing like swimming back now. In the first swimming Olympic Games in 1896 there were only 5 events, only men could compete, and they all swam either front crawl or breaststroke. There was …

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Audio adventures

Audio adventures

There’s just something special about working with sounds. They leave just the right amount to the imagination, but give the listener enough to build that imagination. What I love most about working with radio, is how the spoken word contains so much more than just words. Words are just the information, they are the symbols …

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The Outsider

The Outsider

I recently had the privilege to open this years SpotOn Conference 2013 by being the first of six speakers at the fringe event: The Story Collider. The Story Collider, according to Brian Wecht, provides anyone with a science story some space to tell it. One caveat – the focus is emotional, rather than factual. So the point …

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A Fireside chat about science

A Fireside chat about science

It’s lunch time on Sunday afternoon and the room is full. People are excited to find out what Mozilla has in mind for science. This is the Fireside Chat, where we learn what Kaitlin Thaney, Mark Surman and Josh Greenberg have on their minds for science and the open web. Mozilla recently set up the Mozilla Science Lab, which is directed …

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Open science

Open science

It’s tricky, as I discovered. There are as many meanings as there are people. I’ve been at the first day of Mozfest 2013. Mozfest was big, varied and fun! Coders, hackers, programmers, makers, shakers, the lot. They were all there. I was centred on the second floor where all the science action was taking place. People …

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